Park City Mountain Ski Resort


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When you are looking for some of the best ski resorts Utah has to offer, you will want to check out Park City Mountain Resort. this resort is a ski resort in the western United States in Park City, Utah, located 32 miles (51 km) east of Salt Lake City. Opened in 1963, the resort has been a major tourist attraction for skiers from all over the United States, as well as a main employer for many of Park City’s citizens. Park City, as the ski resort and area is known, contains several training courses for the U.S. Ski Team, including slalom and giant slalom runs. During the 2002 Winter Olympics the resort hosted the snowboarding events and the men’s and women’s alpine giant slalom events. The resort was purchased by Vail Resorts in 2014 and combined the resort with neighboring Canyons Resort via an interconnect gondola to create the largest ski area in the United States.

During the ski season, most slopes and lifts are open from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm with some runs open later for night skiing. One of the most endearing features of the ski resort in Park City is the city itself. There are many art galleries, shops, an outlet mall with many famous brands, and fantastic restaurants. You could easily spend a week here and still leave with a list of things you can do next year.

Park City Ski Resort History

The resort was opened on December 21, 1963 as Treasure Mountain by United Park City Mines. This company was the last surviving mining corporation in Park City, and the resort was opened with funds from a federal government program meant to revive the economically depressed town. When it originally opened, it boasted the longest gondola in the United States, as well as a double chairlift, a J-bar lift, base and summit lodges, and a nine-hole golf course. The gondola was a four-passenger Polig-Heckel-Bleichert (PHB, a German aerial ropeway company). Its sister lift was built at Sugarloaf/USA in Carrabassett Valley, Maine, after top members of Sugarloaf’s management visited Park City’s lift.

When the slopes first opened to the public, a special Skier’s Subway was used to transport skiers nearly 2.5 miles (4.0 km) into the mountain through the pitch-black Spiro Tunnel on a mine train, where skiers then boarded a mining elevator that lifted them 1,750 feet (530 m) to the surface, and from there they had access to the entire mountain. Aerial trams once used for hauling ore were converted into chairlifts. To this day, there are still more than 1,000 miles (1,610 km) of old silver-mine workings and tunnels beneath the slopes at Park City Mountain Resort and its neighboring resort, Deer Valley.

Treasure Mountain’s name was changed to the Park City Ski Area for its fourth season of 1966-67, and in 1996, became known as the Park City Mountain Resort. The resort had grown to include eight peaks and nine bowls, with 3,300 acres (13.4 km2) of skiing and 16 chairlifts. The resort has also developed summer activities including an alpine slide, alpine coaster, zip-lines, and several hiking and biking trails.

A sister ski area, originally known as Park City West and later as Canyons Resort, opened in 1968. Deer Valley Resort opened in December 1981, at the site of the former Snow Park (1946–69).

 

Image provided by:

Eagle Race Arena at Park City Resort” by Rudi Riet from Washington, DC, United States – Eagle Race Arena at Park City Mountain Resort. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons.

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About Rob Ratliff

I created this website to be a place where I could share my travel experiences in Utah. From the time I was a little boy, I've been able to travel all over the world, and Utah is one of the most beautiful and diverse places you will find. I hope that you will share your Utah travel experiences with us too.